post-title The Day After Hurricane Olaf.


The Day After Hurricane Olaf.

The Day After Hurricane Olaf.

 

On September 15 2014, Odile, a category 3 hurricane, made landfall near Cabo San Lucas at 04:45 UTC with winds of 125 mph (205 km/h), which tied the strongest recorded tropical cyclone to move ashore Baja California Sur. Almost 7 years later during the morning of September 9 heavy rains and strong winds reached Cabo San Lucas, Protection services notified that hurricane Olaf was going to hit Cabo in the night or early the next day, announced as category 1. As it approached it strengthened and became category 2.

Olaf hit land near San Jose del Cabo at 10:00 p.m., blowing maximum sustained winds of 100 mph (155 kph), with it came 5 to 10 inches (13 cm to 25 cm) of water, rising as much as 15 inches (38 cm).

Around 6:00 a.m. on September 10 the rain stopped, the winds slowed through the night as Olaf moved steady northwest and away from Lands End. Those who were lucky enough to get some sleep rose from their beds, while those who admired the winds shaking the world around them met in the aftermath.

 

After a good look around, with a steady gaze, in calm, they chose a good place to start cleaning up.

 

 

 

Huracan

It seems like we’re getting good at this.

Unfortunately. 

By 10am most was cleaned up, most were wrapping up their affairs, putting their businesses back in working order. The general consensus is mild disarray. Some branches fallen at most establishments, dirt in the street, some water to mop up due to leaks.

Fortunately spare, and fair between, you find fallen structures and damaged properties. Mostly open roofing structures seem to have had a bad time with the wind.

 

Huracan

Back to the Beach.

The sea looks surprisingly calm, clean, and clear. Somehow, somethings never change.

By 10:30am the beach seemed as if it had been ignored by the storm, the only tell is the wet palapas and the many still around cleaning. Some with a rake, some with makeshift sand shifters.

 

 

Huracan

 

 

There’s an odd contraption that must be pulled by powerful men. It’s a sort of plow you would see a cow pulling from a yoke, but with a handle, heaved by men, waiters from the many beachfront restaurants, flattening the sand which shifter as the sea dramatically embodied the will of the storm.

 

 

Huracan

Huracan

Happily heaved I should add. Happily heaving men, happily shoveling.

 

Huracan

 

 

And just like that, the beach is back to normal. Just like that children are back to play, puppies frolic, and white doves fly.

 

 

Huracan

Huracan

Huracan

 

It’s not to say nothing happened. It’s not to say a storm is no problem. We’ve learned to respect storms. We’ve learned to recover from them. Paradice is a lot less fickle than one might imagine. And that which was mangled is immediately cared for and tended to, so far so it’s even done with a smile.

 

Huracan

 

Just like that by 11:00am there’s a full house accompanied by a line outside Isabel Restaurant & Bar.

 

Huracan

 

 

The streets are clean of debris thanks to El Municipio de Los Cabos who are still at it, there are some puddles here and there. And to those looking for a good time this evening, I’m happy to report the great big red steel shack landmark commonly known as the Squid Row seemed unfazed.

 

Huracan

Huracan

 

By 12:00pm I feel I’ve earned myself a meal. There’s a full house at La Poblanita, but theirs enough room for a table of three. I’m happy to see families out having a nice meal. It seems like we’re back to normal.

 

Huracan

 

 



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